Volume 3, Issue 2, June 2018, Page: 21-28
Changes in Activities of Key Enzymes in Sugarcane Stem at Different Growing Stages
Rongfa Chen, Sugarcane Research Institute of Guangxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Sugarcane Research Center of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanning, China
Xing Huang, Sugarcane Research Institute of Guangxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Sugarcane Research Center of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanning, China
Lihang Qiu, Sugarcane Research Institute of Guangxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Sugarcane Research Center of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanning, China
Yegeng Fan, Sugarcane Research Institute of Guangxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Sugarcane Research Center of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanning, China
Ronghua Zhang, Sugarcane Research Institute of Guangxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Sugarcane Research Center of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanning, China
Jinlan Xie, Sugarcane Research Institute of Guangxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Sugarcane Research Center of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanning, China
Jianming Wu, Sugarcane Research Institute of Guangxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Sugarcane Research Center of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanning, China
Yangrui Li, Sugarcane Research Institute of Guangxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Sugarcane Research Center of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanning, China; Guangxi Key Laboratory of Sugarcane Genetic Improvement, Key Laboratory of Sugarcane Biotechnology and Genetic Improvement (Guangxi), Ministry of Agriculture, Nanning, China
Received: Aug. 22, 2018;       Accepted: Sep. 19, 2018;       Published: Oct. 10, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajpb.20180302.12      View  230      Downloads  12
Abstract
Sugarcane is the most important sugar crop in China, which mainly focuses on the upper stem of the harvested land. The proper regulation of the proportion of internode elongation is the key to determine the yield and sugar. Therefore, it is of great significance to study the mechanism of the dynamic change of elongation between cane joints in order to improve the yield of sugar cane and sucrose. To investigate the biochemical mechanism of stem elongation in sugarcane, stem samples were collected at the pre-elongation stage (9-10 leaves) (Ls1), early elongation stage (12-13 leaves) (Ls2) and rapid elongation stage (15-16 leaves) (Ls3). The change trends in the activities of NAD kinase (NADK), calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPKs), α-mannosidase, α-galactosidase, β-glucosidase, cellulase, xyloglucan endo-transglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH) and catalase (CAT) were completely consistent, showing rapid elongation stage > early elongation stage > pre-elongation stage, while the activities of β-glucosidase, peroxidase (POD) and α-glucosidase were in opposite, and the activities of calmodulin and β-mannosidase showed the same single-peak trend, and the peak was at early elongation stage. The enzyme activities of β-galactosidase and pectinase did not show significant difference at different stages. The results indicate that the elongation of internodes was closely related to the complex physiological metabolism of sugarcane, and the key enzymes play roles at different time but β-galactosidase and pectinase have little effect on internodes elongation in sugarcane.
Keywords
Sugarcane, Stem Elongation, Enzyme Activity, Metabolism
To cite this article
Rongfa Chen, Xing Huang, Lihang Qiu, Yegeng Fan, Ronghua Zhang, Jinlan Xie, Jianming Wu, Yangrui Li, Changes in Activities of Key Enzymes in Sugarcane Stem at Different Growing Stages, American Journal of Plant Biology. Vol. 3, No. 2, 2018, pp. 21-28. doi: 10.11648/j.ajpb.20180302.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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