Volume 2, Issue 1, February 2017, Page: 35-42
Contribution to the Knowledge of Melliferous Plants: Pollen Analysis of Supposed Honeys of Dialium guineensis (FABACEAE), by the Beekeepers of Ziguinchor (Senegal)
Kady Diatta, Department of Pharmacy, Cheikh Anta DIOP University, Dakar, Senegal
Marie José Battesti, Faculty of Sciences, Pasquale PAOLI University, Corsica, France
William Diatta, Department of Pharmacy, Cheikh Anta DIOP University, Dakar, Senegal
Alioune Dior Fall, Department of Pharmacy, Cheikh Anta DIOP University, Dakar, Senegal
Serigne Ibra Mbacké Dieng, Department of Pharmacy, Cheikh Anta DIOP University, Dakar, Senegal
Amadou Ibrahima Mbaye, Department of Pharmacy, Cheikh Anta DIOP University, Dakar, Senegal
Assane Goudiaby, Institute of Sciences of the Environment, Cheikh Anta DIOP University, Dakar, Senegal
Aliou Guisse, Department of Plant Biology, Cheikh Anta DIOP University, Dakar, Senegal
Emmanuel Bassene, Department of Pharmacy, Cheikh Anta DIOP University, Dakar, Senegal
Received: Jan. 4, 2017;       Accepted: Jan. 14, 2017;       Published: Feb. 9, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajpb.20170201.16      View  2395      Downloads  59
Abstract
Pollen analysis, a technique for identifying pollen grains and hence the plant taxa visited by bees, is a means of clarifying the floral origin of honey. The objective of this study is to determine the pollen composition of the supposed honey of Dialium guineensis Willd to verify the geographical and botanical origins given by the beekeepers. The pollen analysis of the supposed honeys of Dialium guineensis was carried out according by authors. The identification and enumeration of the pollen was done under the microscope. Pollens are usually classified according to the four categories proposed by authors according to the value of the relative frequency (R F): dominant pollen whose frequency > 45%; accompanying pollen; 16 ≤ frequency ≤ 45%; Important isolated pollen; 3 ≤ frequency ≤ 15% pollen isolated when frequency < to 3%. A total of 14 taxa divided into 7 families were identified. Depending on the maximum FR value reached, the dominant taxa are Elaeis guineensis with a RF of 74.04% and Avicennia sp with 46.67%. The largest RF found for Dialium guineensis is 14.56%. The nectariferous taxa represent 45.45%, the nectariferous and polliniferous taxa 36.36% and the polliniferous taxa 18.18%. The Dialium guineensis is nectariferous but is not dominant in any of the samples. As for Elaeis guineensis, it is dominant in a single sample but cannot determine the botanical origin because it is a polliniferous plant. The botanical origin is determined by the nectarifer taxon hence the name of honey. The honey name of Dialium is not appropriate because the taxon is either isolated or isolated important. However we have honey from Avicennia sp or mangrove honey whose taxon is nectariferous and dominant in one of the samples.
Keywords
Honey Plants, Dialium guineensis, Pollen Analysis, Honey, Ziguinchor, Senegal
To cite this article
Kady Diatta, Marie José Battesti, William Diatta, Alioune Dior Fall, Serigne Ibra Mbacké Dieng, Amadou Ibrahima Mbaye, Assane Goudiaby, Aliou Guisse, Emmanuel Bassene, Contribution to the Knowledge of Melliferous Plants: Pollen Analysis of Supposed Honeys of Dialium guineensis (FABACEAE), by the Beekeepers of Ziguinchor (Senegal), American Journal of Plant Biology. Vol. 2, No. 1, 2017, pp. 35-42. doi: 10.11648/j.ajpb.20170201.16
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
Agwu O. C, Obuwekwe A. I, Iwu M. M. (1989). Pollen analytical and layer chromatographic examination of Nsukka (Nigeria) honey. Pollen et Spores 33: 29-43.
[2]
AEL 2012 / http://www.au-senegal.com/decoupage-administratif-de-la-region-de-ziguinchor,041.html
[3]
Battesti M. J. (1990). Contribution to the Mediterranean Melissopalynology: Corsican honeys. PhD Thesis, University of Marseille St. Jérôme (Aix-Marseille III), France 261p.
[4]
Battesti M. J, & Goeury C. (1992 Effectiveness of quantitative melissopalynological analysis for certification of the geographical and botanical origins of honeys: The model of Corsican honey. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 75, 77-102.
[5]
Caritini Cl, & Guinet Ph. (1974). Pollen et spores d’Afrique Tropicale, Centre d’Etudes de Géographie Tropicale, CNRS, n° 16, 282p.
[6]
Demenou B. B. (2006). Inventory of melliferous plants and pollen characterization of honey from beekeeping farms in the Sudano-Guinean zone of Manigri. Memory of the Diploma of Engineer of the Works. EPAC / UAC / Cotonou- Benin, 68 p.
[7]
Delphine, D. N. and Joseph, T. (2015) Palynological and Physical Characterization of Honey in the Sudano-Guinean Area of Cameroon. Food and Nutrition Sciences, 6, 1339-1350. Http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/fns.2015.615140
[8]
Fohounfo H. T. (2002). Honey plants and pollen composition of honeys from the short rainy season and the large dry season in southern Benin. Memory of the Diploma of Engineer of the Works. CPU / UAC / Cotonou (Benin), 56 p.
[9]
Goudiaby A. (2000). Study of the spatio-temporal characteristics of bush fires and their relationship with vegetation in the Niokolokoba National Park (South-East of Senegal), Thesis Doctorate in Environmental Science, FST / UCAD Dakar 139 pages.
[10]
Guinet Ph & Caratini Cl. (1974). Pollen and spores of tropical Africa. Center for Tropical Geography Studies, CNRS, No. 16, 282p.
[11]
Koudegnan C. M, Edorh T. M, Guelly A. K, Batawilla K, and Akpagana K. (2012). "Inventory of pollen taxa of honeys in the Guinean zone of Togo: Case of ecofloristic zones IV and V," Eur. Sci. J., vol. 8, no. 26, p. 37-50.
[12]
Lobreau-Callen D, Darchen R, Le Thomas A. (1986). Contribution of the palynology to the knowledge of the relations bees / plants in the savannas of Togo and Benin. Apidology 17: 279-306.
[13]
Louveaux J, Maurizio A, Vorwohl G (1970). Methods of melissopalynology. Bee World. 51: 125-131.
[14]
Louveaux J, Maurizo A, Vornwoh G. (1978). Methods of mellissopalynology. Bee World 59: 139-57.
[15]
Maurizio A. (1968). Harvesting and storing pollen by bees. Biology of the bee, 111, 168-173, Masson éd
[16]
Rasoloarijao T. M (2013). Pollen analysis of honeys from Madagascar and two islands of the Mascarenes (Réunion island - Rodrigues island), DEA dissertation, Palynology Applied, University of Antananarivo, 102 pages.
[17]
Ricciardelli d’albore et Bernardini M. B (1978). Geographical origin of royal jelly, Apidologie, Springer Verlag, 9 (1), pp. 1-17.
[18]
Tossou G. M, Akoègninou A, Yédomonhan H, Batawila K, Akpagana K. (2005). Pollen analysis of the honeys of the classified forest of the Lama (Benin) and its contribution to the knowledge of the apiculture flora. Journal of Agricultural Research, Lomé University, Togo, A series, 7: 83-92.
[19]
Tossou G. M, Yedomonhan H, Azokpota P, Akoegninou A, Doubogan P, Akpagana K. (2011). Pollen analysis and phytogeographical characterization of honeys Sold in Cotonou (Benin). Cah agric 20: 500-8. Doi: 10.1684/agr.0527.
[20]
Vergeron Ph. (1964). Statistical interpretation of results in pollen analysis of honeys. Ann. Abeille 7 (4), 349-364. Wodehouse R. P. (1935) Pollen Grains. Mc. Graw-Hill Book Co., New York, London, 574 p.
[21]
Wodehouse R. P. (1935). Pollen Grains. Mc. Graw-Hill Book Co., New York, London, 574 p.
[22]
Ybert J. P. (1979). Pollen Atlas of Côte d'Ivoire. Paris: Orstom editions. White F, 1986. The vegetation of Africa. Paris: Editions Orstom-Unesco.), 68 Pages.
[23]
Yédomonhan H, Tossou M. G, Akoègninou A, Demènou B. B, et Traoré D. (2009). Diversity of melliferous plants in the Sudano-Guinean zone: case of the Borough of Manigri (Center-Ouest du Benin J. Biol. Chem. Sci. 3 (2): 355-366, ISSN 1991-8631, 12 pages. http://indexmedicus.afro.who.int.
Browse journals by subject